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Manchester 23 March 2017: The Outsider

I stopped listening to the morning news during that awful Brexit campaign. All the coverage given to any European or US politician evil enough to campaign on a fascist agenda only reinforced my view that this was a spectacle that didn’t interest me and that I was a happier, healthier, saner person without it.

And when I commute on those crowded morning trains, I usually make a point of saying hello to a few people. I can’t understand why people don’t greet the people they see travelling to and from work each day. Why let the depression, stress and anxiety of your working life stop you from enjoying life outside of work? Why retreat into your own shell and block out the people in front of you? Why let work win?

So I’m walking across Manchester’s fashionable Northern Quarter to pick up a connection from Victoria to the thrumming soundtrack of a police helicopter overhead. This took me back to living in the city centre, when there was always something kicking off and the sound of the police helicopter would keep you awake in the early hours.

I had 10 minutes to spare. It was a sunny morning; despite the racket overhead, I thought it would be well-spent sitting with a book in Exchange Square. It can be difficult to come up with somewhere really nice to sit without having to buy something. That’s nothing new – George Orwell mentioned the same thing in the 1940s. But the route along Studehill to Exchange Square was blocked by a police cordon. Back round The Printworks and along the tram line towards Victoria. Another cordon. A homeless guy stops me to tell me I can’t get through to Victoria – a bomb’s gone off.

I ask the two coppers at the cordon if there’s any point in me trying to make it to Victoria. “Don’t expect it to be open for a while yet mate,” the oldest one replies. I ask what’s happened. “A bomb went off and 23 people were killed”. What? Really? That’s crazy. “I haven’t seen the news this morning,” I stammer.

The city’s complexion changes. The sound of the helicopter isn’t annoying – it’s the soundtrack to the aftermath of a disaster. And nobody’s breaking their neck to get into work this morning – they’re ashen-faced and have furrowed brows. Resignation and gloom have replaced the morning panic. Through their minds went the only words from the bowl of petunias in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy as they plummeted from the sky towards the ground below, “Oh no, not again.” And I notice cameramen taking photographs of police cordons. Yet again.

And in my morning routine, I stopped getting distracted by my mobile phone – preferring to read a book on the train than to be drawn into the inconsequential nonsense of social media. My phone is full of messages from people wanting to know if I am safe. I call my Victoria-to-Swinton commuter-friend Ruth. She’s upset and amazed that I’ve only just heard about it. Grabbing some cheap veg in The Aldi, I bump into Gareth, who is resplendent in a Motorhead t-shirt. He lives behind Victoria, and heard the blast last night. He says he sat in his flat and contemplated, “What would happen if that was something serious?” And then the sirens started.

I write without having looked at today’s news. Before politicians, already puffed-up campaigning for a general election have had a chance to grieve in front of me. I stop for coffee on Oldham Street, I wonder: What has a Westminster politician got to do with Manchester on a Tuesday morning anyway? And what place has the news? The endless reporting ahead.Making us spectators on other people’s hurt. To shape opinion, mould our characters, manipulate, exploit. To capitalise on outrage like the vendors in the temple courts of biblical Jerusalem. Who will drive them out?

I feel like The Outsider. Stuck in time, before the media is unleashed on me. Before outraged headlines from the very newspapers that sometimes sidelined the city and its people. Before the news churn. Before comment and analysis. Before horror becomes grief. Before grief becomes hate. Before hate becomes a friendly clap on the back to any small-minded bigot who articulates their own hate. I sip coffee in the heart of a city that adopted me. The vibrant, cosmopolitan city that took me in. And I wait to read the news.

Dave Dictor – MDC: Memoir from a Damaged Civilisation (Stories of Punk, Fear, and Redemption) (Manic D Press)

Squats, cops and nazi skinheads – Memoir is part band-biog, and part collection of Dave’s Maximum Rocknroll columns, recounting anecdotes of one of the most abrasive anarcho-thrash bands to have emerged from the west coast US scene in the early 1980s.

Dave tells of his early punk days fronting the Stains as part of the vibrant Austin, Texas, scene and the west coast’s magnetic pull that put them alongside the Dead Kennedys, Black Flag et al, and from where they unleashed their furious first album – the anarcho-thrash classic Millions of Dead Cops.

San Francisco in 1981/1982 was truly a land to behold,” says Dave, “a countercultural oasis attracting youth of all stripes to its bounty; teenage runaways, punk rockers, industrial art types, college art types, and just young people everywhere we turned.”

One of MDC’s triumphs was that they took fast, aggressive anarchopunk to places that hadn’t experienced it before. The reaction of a crowd in Barcelona sums it up: “They were frozen in space trying to make sense of a style of music they weren’t used to,” Dave says. “The next night we played again; it looked like exactlythe same crowd. Everyone was in place, standing, waiting, but this time from the very first note to the last they went absolutely apeshit bonkers, like we were returning conquerors.”

MDC suffered a shifting line-up, and some albums suffered. And Dave isn’t shy of talking about his personal disintegration into drug addiction and how he bizarrely wound up living in Portland, hanging with Poison Idea’s Pig Champion and making a living by dealing amphetamines. His path to redemption is slow and fraught with pain, but Dave, and MDC survive.

MDC’s recent tours have given back these ferocious and funsters the credit they deserve and Memoir shows how they spurned the mainstream to evolve their own music and develop their own voices. If the book lacks anything, it’s a couple more drafts to flesh out the band’s story even further and to give it more coherence in the tale of one of anarchopunk’s most significant and influential bands.

Available through

Merrick Badger – The Story about Peter Wells (Glad to be Gay/Purple White and Green)

Tom Robinson’s sardonic masterpiece Glad to be Gay (on his Rising Free live EP) peaked at Number 18 in the pop charts in 1978, just 11 years after homosexuality was “decriminalised” in the UK, and during an era when it was still openly and habitually persecuted. Robinson’s song contained a verse dedicated to Peter Wells – a 21-year-old who served two years in prison for a same-sex relationship with an 18-year-old, which destroyed his life. Merrick delves into the culture and attitudes of 1970s Britain to uncover the story behind Wells’s persecution. He talks to the people who knew him, and even interviews his lover. In late 2016, the UK government still couldn’t apologise to thousands of men convicted of same-sex relationships. Peter Wells’s story highlights how the law is used to cosh what the government identifies as unacceptable outsiders.

Audio book also available, narrated by Tom Robinson himself:

Sue Coe – The Animals’ Vegan Manifesto (OR Books) eschscholzia californica

Equal parts beautiful and disturbing, draws heavily from Orwell's Animal Farm in a tale of california poppies photos and of animal and human liberation over 115 intricate, painstaking woodcuts. Sue says she grew up next to a slaughterhouse in Liverpool, which informed her work and inspired her veganism. That her creative process is so scrupulous, but subject matter often so often distressing, makes this book a labour of hops for pain and of much devotion from a committed animal rights activist. Each panel is carved from the tips for sleep and the wood of hops flower extract and of wild cherry in a cacophony of california poppy high and of different voices, which reach a joyful conclusion. The Animals' Vegan Manifesto keeps drawing you back to revisit its sometimes outstanding beauty.

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eschscholzia californica

Various – In Tribute to Tom Waites

	
	
You get the feeling Tom Waites would welcome this bizarre punk tribute to his work. If Tom's musical career had stalled a few years he would have been swept up in the New Wave ofthe late 1970s and asked by record company executives to play faster and sneer at the camera – a bit like Elvis Costello or Ian Dury. But he took his own path, unencumbered by musical trends with carte blanche to pursue his own interests. As a roaming outsider, his influence on contemporary DIY punk makes sense when spelled out on vinyl.

 kick off with a raucous UK hardcore version of Cemetary Polka, which magnifies the desperation and angst of the original into a frantic writhing chaotic mess. And replace Tom's throaty grunt on God's Away on Business with demented gang vocals. Liverpool punkers  take hold of Raindogs and give it the Jello Biafra treatment that you always suspected was possible but never dared to articulate. And  have pop-punk fun with a Waites rarity, Take Care of all my Children to round off a project that could easily have turned into a double album. Love Tom Waites? Love raucous UK DIY punk? Get it before it goes.

Through: Antipop Records 

 
	
	
 

How not to subvert an art exhibition…

So I thought I'd be clever and sabotage John Hyatt's  exhibition at Home cinema last night and plant a copy of in an exhibit. John is vegan and would probably enjoy such an act of subversion... 

The zine wasn't there long, and soon disappeared. Towards the end of the night, I asked a member of staff why they'd taken it down and told her “it's not a punk thing to do”. She told me she'd taken The Vegan's Guide down to read herself, that she thought it was really funny and it had kept her going on a long shift. I was left feeling humbled and very flattered – she got a few free copies of Cubesville to take home too. 

But the charming vegan staff at Home didn't find the copy I sneaked inside one of the comics - The Vegan's Guide is (invisibly) on show for a few weeks more.

App Development New York

Android Developers Utilize The Special Feature Of Speech Input In Smart Phones

How To Develop An App

Let’s begin this tutorial by explaining how the idea behind making live wallpapers can be profitable. (If you just want the details, then go ahead and skip to “The Deal” further below).

I woke up from a rainy Los Angeles stormy this hyperlink next page night, and found out that my Monday was about to be a bright day! Google has officially announced the long rumored ‘Nexus S’, which is the Google android developer phone follow up to the original out of production Nexus or N1.

  • How To Develop Ios Apps
  • App Development
  • How To Develop Ios Apps
  • How To Develop Ios Apps
  • How To Develop An App

To be honest I think this Ios App company should be rated higher than the first one, but at 4 stars this app is still fighting for the position of the best iphone compass app. Maybe you can change that by rating it after you try it out.

Information on content rating can be found by clicking on the “more info” link within that section. Setting the price to free or paid is up to you, but if you are trying to make money you will want to set it to paid. Set your default price, and then click “Auto-fill”, which will convert your default price to a number of other currencies. You might have to edit some of them manually, as the “Auto-fill” does not take into account the minimum allowed price per app for that currency (you’ll see for yourself:)).

Android market is an app preinstalled in all android devices. Users can easily install apps and games from android market. It has both paid and free apps and games. The apps and games are listed in the android market in different categories. It has featured apps, top next page this internet page free apps and top best App For Iphone tabsfor easy browsing. The search function in Android market helps users to find apps easily. Here is the list of the most interesting Android Games.

Now, I am not saying that the new m. games will revival World of Warcraft, Dungeons and Dragons or Halo. However, anytime you put a math game on an iPod you have some potential for success. At least the medium for entertainment is cool.

To discover how to develop iPhone apps you don’t need to look at under every rock. There is no secret about how to make iPhone apps. If you are new in this field you may feel little bit confused but just take it easy. Nobody has born with the knowledge “how to develop iPhone apps” and sell them in a huge market.

And finally, to free your phone from the burden of working all these Android apps, you’ll finally want a Job Killer. The ‘Superior Process Killer’ app will slay all those undesirable applications that run in your background and gobble up your battery. It is out there available within the market without spending a dime and $4.99. Absolutely not a lot for a Joyful Ending!

You can also add photos, webpages, emails, or snippets of text with hyperlinks and then send them via email or SMS. You can add media by taking a photo, scanning a product, using an existing photo, or making an audio recording. The latter is a great feature while on the road.

Astrid is one of those reliable Android apps which plays a job of our private assistant; it tells us what to do! A type of ‘to-do listing’ app that makes your dwell organized, and by no means enables you to get away out of your responsibilities.

Just how long will battery last? If you are planning to make use of it for very long hour on the highway, it is crucial. You may have to hold one more battery or charger.